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Proceedings Paper

Directional diffusivity as a magnetic resonance (MR) biomarker in demyelinating disease
Author(s): Tammie L. S. Benzinger; Anne H. Cross; Junqian Xu; Robert Naismith; Shu-Wei Sun; Sheng-Kwei Song
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Paper Abstract

Directional diffusivities derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) measurements describe water movement parallel to (λ||, axial diffusivity) and perpendicular to (λ⊥radial diffusivity) axonal tracts. λ|| and λ⊥ have been shown to differentially detect axon and myelin abnormalities in several mouse models of central nervous system white matter pathology in our laboratory. These models include experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), (1) myelin basic protein mutant mice with dysmyelination and intact axons, (2) cuprizone-induced demyelination, and remyelination, with reversible axon injury (2, 3) and a model of retinal ischemia in which retinal ganglion cell death is followed by Wallerian degeneration of optic nerve, with axonal injury preceding demyelination. (4) Decreased λ|| correlates with acute axonal injury and increased λ⊥ indicates myelin damage. (4) More recently, we have translated this approach to human MR, investigating acute and chronic optic neuritis in adults with multiple sclerosis, brain lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in children. We are also investigating the use of this technique to probe the underlying structural change of the cervical spinal cord in acute and chronic T2- hyperintense lesions in spinal stenosis, trauma, and transverse myelitis. In each of these demyelinating diseases, the discrimination between axonal and myelin injury which we can achieve has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. For those patients with myelin injury but intact axons, early, directed drug therapy has the potential to prevent progression to axonal loss and permanent disability.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 October 2007
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6759, Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology V, 67590O (5 October 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.740133
Show Author Affiliations
Tammie L. S. Benzinger, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Anne H. Cross, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Junqian Xu, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Robert Naismith, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Shu-Wei Sun, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Sheng-Kwei Song, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6759:
Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology V
Brian M. Cullum; D. Marshall Porterfield, Editor(s)

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