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Proceedings Paper

Can we predict aerosol extinction in a coastal environment?
Author(s): Dimitri Tsintikidis; Dan Kichura; Steve Hammel
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Paper Abstract

We have been engaged in a long-term test to determine the beam extinction effects of aerosols. During four test periods of one month duration each, we propagated a beam over a 7-km path near the ocean surface, and measured the received intensity in two near-infrared wavebands (1.061 μm and at 1.622 μm). In each test period, meteorological measurements were obtained from a meteorological buoy located at the mid-point of the propagation path. These meteorological data were used as input for the Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM). In this paper we will describe the comparison between the ANAM predictions and the measured transmission. We found that there are significant and sustained discrepancies between the ANAM model predictions and the optical transmission data. We will focus on two particular problems that have emerged from our comparison: first, the ANAM dependence on local wind speed can cause errors, and second, the local relative humidity is not optimally coupled in the ANAM. We will present the analysis we used to support these claims, and we will present recommendations for modifications to the model.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 September 2007
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 6708, Atmospheric Optics: Models, Measurements, and Target-in-the-Loop Propagation, 67080O (25 September 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.736769
Show Author Affiliations
Dimitri Tsintikidis, Atmospheric Propagation Branch, SSC, San Diego (United States)
Dan Kichura, Atmospheric Propagation Branch, SSC, San Diego (United States)
Steve Hammel, Atmospheric Propagation Branch, SSC, San Diego (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6708:
Atmospheric Optics: Models, Measurements, and Target-in-the-Loop Propagation
Stephen M. Hammel; Alexander M. J. van Eijk; Michael T. Valley; Mikhail A. Vorontsov, Editor(s)

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