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Proceedings Paper

Characterization of nanoparticles by computer imaging particle analysis
Author(s): J. DaPonte; T. Sadowski; C. C. Broadbridge; P. Munhutu; A. Lehman; D. Krishnamoorthy; E. C. Garcia; M. S. Sawicki; C. Heyden; L. Mirabelle; P. Benjamin
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Paper Abstract

Nanoparticles, particles with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers (nm), are of interest in many applications including device fabrication, quantum computing, and sensing because their decreased size may give rise to certain properties that are very different from those exhibited by bulk materials. Further advancement of nanotechnology cannot be realized without an increased understanding of nanoparticle properties such as size (diameter) and size distribution. Frequently, these parameters are evaluated using numerous imaging modalities including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the past, these parameters have been obtained from digitized images by manually measuring and counting many of these nanoparticles, a task that is highly subjective and labor intensive. Recently, computer imaging particle analysis routines that count and measure objects in a binary image1 have emerged as an objective and rapid alternative to manual techniques. In this paper a procedure is described that can be used to preprocess a set of gray scale images so that they are correctly thresholded into binary images prior to a particle analysis ultimately resulting in a more accurate assessment of the size and frequency (size distribution) of nanoparticles. Particle analysis was performed on two types of calibration samples imaged using AFM and TEM. Additionally, results of particle analysis can be used for identifying and removing small noise particles from the image. This filtering technique is based on identifying the location of small particles in the binary image, assessing their size, and removing them without affecting the size of other larger particles.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 October 2007
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6768, Nanomaterials Synthesis, Interfacing, and Integrating in Devices, Circuits, and Systems II, 676807 (10 October 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.734966
Show Author Affiliations
J. DaPonte, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
T. Sadowski, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
C. C. Broadbridge, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
P. Munhutu, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
A. Lehman, Trinity College (United States)
Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
D. Krishnamoorthy, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
E. C. Garcia, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
M. S. Sawicki, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
C. Heyden, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
L. Mirabelle, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)
P. Benjamin, Southern Connecticut State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6768:
Nanomaterials Synthesis, Interfacing, and Integrating in Devices, Circuits, and Systems II
Nibir K. Dhar; Achyut K. Dutta; M. Saif Islam, Editor(s)

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