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Proceedings Paper

Performance of a prototype electrostatic analyzer for future solar and heliophysics missions
Author(s): D. O. Kataria; G. Collinson; A. J. Coates; A. N. Fazakerley; C. J. Owen; B. Taylor; L. Bradley
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Paper Abstract

In-situ instrumentation for proposed future solar and heliophysics missions close to the sun, e.g., ESA's Solar Orbiter and NASA's Solar Sentinels, have challenging requirements. Notably, the two major challenges are the large dynamic range required to be covered and the mission lifetime. For example, the proposed orbit of Solar Orbiter ranges from 0.22 AU to 1.39 AU, resulting in up to 2 orders of magnitude change in flux that the instrument is required to handle, with a proposed mission life of greater than 10 years. We present details of a prototype instrument that is currently being developed to address some of these challenges. The instrument is a conventional "top-hat" type symmetric quadrispheric analyzer with a pair of electrostatic deflector plates designed to accept approximately ± 40° in elevation. Optimization of the geometry of the deflector plates will be discussed and preliminary results of the performance of the instrument will be presented. In addition, some of the other techniques and strategies that will be required to deliver the necessary performance will also be discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 September 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6689, Solar Physics and Space Weather Instrumentation II, 668912 (20 September 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.734660
Show Author Affiliations
D. O. Kataria, Mullard Space Science Lab. (United Kingdom)
G. Collinson, Mullard Space Science Lab. (United Kingdom)
A. J. Coates, Mullard Space Science Lab. (United Kingdom)
A. N. Fazakerley, Mullard Space Science Lab. (United Kingdom)
C. J. Owen, Mullard Space Science Lab. (United Kingdom)
B. Taylor, Mullard Space Science Lab. (United Kingdom)
L. Bradley, Mullard Space Science Lab. (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6689:
Solar Physics and Space Weather Instrumentation II
Silvano Fineschi; Rodney A. Viereck, Editor(s)

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