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Proceedings Paper

Imaging through diffusive layers using speckle pattern fractal analysis and application to embedded object detection in tissues
Author(s): George Tremberger; A. Flamholz; E. Cheung; R. Sullivan; R. Subramaniam; P. Schneider; G. Brathwaite; J. Boteju; P. Marchese; D. Lieberman; T. Cheung; Todd Holden
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Paper Abstract

The absorption effect of the back surface boundary of a diffuse layer was studied via laser generated reflection speckle pattern. The spatial speckle intensity provided by a laser beam was measured. The speckle data were analyzed in terms of fractal dimension (computed by NIH ImageJ software via the box counting fractal method) and weak localization theory based on Mie scattering. Bar code imaging was modeled as binary absorption contrast and scanning resolution in millimeter range was achieved for diffusive layers up to thirty transport mean free path thick. Samples included alumina, porous glass and chicken tissue. Computer simulation was used to study the effect of speckle spatial distribution and observed fractal dimension differences were ascribed to variance controlled speckle sizes. Fractal dimension suppressions were observed in samples that had thickness dimensions around ten transport mean free path. Computer simulation suggested a maximum fractal dimension of about 2 and that subtracting information could lower fractal dimension. The fractal dimension was shown to be sensitive to sample thickness up to about fifteen transport mean free paths, and embedded objects which modified 20% or more of the effective thickness was shown to be detectable. The box counting fractal method was supplemented with the Higuchi data series fractal method and application to architectural distortion mammograms was demonstrated. The use of fractals in diffusive analysis would provide a simple language for a dialog between optics experts and mammography radiologists, facilitating the applications of laser diagnostics in tissues.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 October 2007
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6771, Advanced Photon Counting Techniques II, 677117 (15 October 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.732302
Show Author Affiliations
George Tremberger, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
A. Flamholz, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
E. Cheung, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
R. Sullivan, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
R. Subramaniam, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
P. Schneider, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
G. Brathwaite, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
J. Boteju, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
P. Marchese, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
D. Lieberman, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
T. Cheung, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)
Todd Holden, CUNY, Queensborough Community College (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6771:
Advanced Photon Counting Techniques II
Wolfgang Becker, Editor(s)

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