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Proceedings Paper

Design, construction, alignment, and calibration of a compact velocimetry experiment
Author(s): Morris I. Kaufman; Robert M. Malone; Brent C. Frogget; David L. Esquibel; Vincent T. Romero; Gregory A. Lare; Bart Briggs; Adam J. Iverson; Daniel K. Frayer; Douglas DeVore; Brian Cata; David B. Holtkamp; Mark D. Wilke; Nick S. P. King; Michael R. Furlanetto; Matthew E. Briggs; Michael D. Furnish
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Paper Abstract

A velocimetry experiment has been designed to measure shock properties for small cylindrical metal targets (8-mm-diameter by 2-mm thick). A target is accelerated by high explosives, caught, and retrieved for later inspection. The target is expected to move at a velocity of 0.1 to 3 km/sec. The complete experiment canister is approximately 105 mm in diameter and 380 mm long. Optical velocimetry diagnostics include the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The packaging of the velocity diagnostics is not allowed to interfere with the catchment or an X-ray imaging diagnostic. A single optical relay, using commercial lenses, collects Doppler-shifted light for both VISAR and PDV. The use of fiber optics allows measurement of point velocities on the target surface during accelerations occurring over 15 mm of travel. The VISAR operates at 532 nm and has separate illumination fibers requiring alignment. The PDV diagnostic operates at 1550 nm, but is aligned and focused at 670 nm. The VISAR and PDV diagnostics are complementary measurements and they image spots in close proximity on the target surface. Because the optical relay uses commercial glass, the axial positions of the optical fibers for PDV and VISAR are offset to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The optomechanical design requires careful attention to fiber management, mechanical assembly and disassembly, positioning of the foam catchment, and X-ray diagnostic field-of-view. Calibration and alignment data are archived at each stage of the assembly sequence.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 September 2007
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6676, Optical System Alignment and Tolerancing, 667607 (21 September 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.732233
Show Author Affiliations
Morris I. Kaufman, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Robert M. Malone, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Brent C. Frogget, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
David L. Esquibel, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Vincent T. Romero, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Gregory A. Lare, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Bart Briggs, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Adam J. Iverson, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Daniel K. Frayer, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Douglas DeVore, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Brian Cata, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
David B. Holtkamp, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Mark D. Wilke, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Nick S. P. King, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Michael R. Furlanetto, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Matthew E. Briggs, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Michael D. Furnish, Sandia National Labs. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6676:
Optical System Alignment and Tolerancing
José M. Sasian; Mitchell C. Ruda, Editor(s)

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