Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Optimal location of feedback handler under receiver contention schemes for routing in wireless networks
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Due to the broadcast and error prone nature of wireless medium, novel routing mechanisms based on receiver contention have been proposed recently. The intuition of this strategy is, transmitters make routing decisions based on contentions of nodes that have successful reception. A remarkable advantage of receiver contention is the long average advancement of transmissions. To the best our knowledge, existing works utilizing receiver contention schemes are all based on a common assumption. That is, feedback packets sent by contending nodes are all destined to the transmitters. However, probability of reception is a function of distance. The longer the distance is, the lower the reception probability will be5. According to this relation, we argue that transmitters may not be the best nodes to taking care of contention packets. In this paper, we consider uniformly distributed sensor networks, and propose the optimal locations, in terms of maximizing the expected advancement of each transmission, to place nodes which are responsible for handling feedback packets. We call these nodes feedback handlers. Based on the simulation results, placing the feedback handlers on the optimal locations can raise expected advancement up to about 30 percent, comparing to existing works.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 September 2007
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6697, Advanced Signal Processing Algorithms, Architectures, and Implementations XVII, 66970J (21 September 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.731611
Show Author Affiliations
Pai-Han Huang, Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Bhaskar Krishnamachari, Univ. of Southern California (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6697:
Advanced Signal Processing Algorithms, Architectures, and Implementations XVII
Franklin T. Luk, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top