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Proceedings Paper

Reconstruction of disturbance spatial structure for upper atmosphere using measurements from dense GPS network GEONET
Author(s): Edward L. Afraimovich; Vladislav V. Kiryushkin; Nataly P. Perevalova; Mikhail V. Mas'kin
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Paper Abstract

We present procedure of ionospheric disturbance spatial structure reconstruction. The procedure is based on the imaging of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) increments distribution. The TEC value is measured using data from Japanese GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) which includes more than 1000 two-frequency ground-based GPS receivers. To reconstruct disturbance spatial structure we selected the TEC increment values and corresponding geographic coordinates of the ionospheric point for the specified time moment. The obtained data is spline-approximated on equal stationary reference grid. To test presented procedure we reconstructed spatial structure of ionospheric disturbance, specially simulated for conditions of September 25, 2003, Hokkaido strong earthquake. The results of testing showed, that the presented procedure provides reconstruction of disturbance spatial structure and its dynamics with high time resolution.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 November 2006
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6522, Thirteenth Joint International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics/ Atmospheric Physics, 652225 (1 November 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.723278
Show Author Affiliations
Edward L. Afraimovich, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russia)
Vladislav V. Kiryushkin, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russia)
Nataly P. Perevalova, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russia)
Mikhail V. Mas'kin, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6522:
Thirteenth Joint International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics/ Atmospheric Physics

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