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Proceedings Paper

Behavior of a laser beam wandering with turbulent path length
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Paper Abstract

We experimentally study the variance of the transverse displacement (wandering) of a laser beam after it has traveled through indoor artificially convective turbulence. In a previous paper (Opt. Comm., Vol. 242, N° 1-3, pp. 76-63, November 2004) we have modeled the atmospheric turbulent refractive index as a fractional Brownian motion. As a consequence, a different behavior is expected for the wandering variance. It behaves as L2+2H , where L is the propagation length and H the Hurst exponent associated to the fractional Brownian motion. The traditional cubic dependence is recovered when H=1/2--the ordinary Brownian motion. That is the case of strong turbulence or long propagation path length. Otherwise, for weak turbulence and short propagation path length some deviations from the usual expression should be found. In this presentation we experimentally confirm the previous assertion.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 November 2006
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 6522, Thirteenth Joint International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics/ Atmospheric Physics, 65220M (1 November 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.723051
Show Author Affiliations
Gustavo Funes, Ctr. de Investigaciones Ópticas (Argentina)
Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)
Damián Gulich, Ctr. de Investigaciones Ópticas (Argentina)
Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)
Luciano Zunino, Ctr. de Investigaciones Ópticas (Argentina)
Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)
Darío G. Pérez, Pontificia Univ. Católica de Valparaíso (Chile)
Mario Garavaglia, Ctr. de Investigaciones Ópticas (Argentina)
Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6522:
Thirteenth Joint International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics/ Atmospheric Physics

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