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Proceedings Paper

EO/IR/laser illumination sensors for perimeter security
Author(s): David Natelson
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Paper Abstract

The integration of varied types of EO, IR, and Laser Illumination sensors used for perimeter security greatly improves the data that is available to the process of classifying potential threats. A key component of the design of layered sets of sensors is to understand the method in which detection, recognition, and identification distances are defined by each vendor. Historically, it has been challenging to compare each vendor's stated values as each type of sensor has unique characteristics that hinder the process of performing a so called "apples to apples" comparison. This results in more costly field testing and software simulations that attempt to model real world deployments. What we do know is that solutions are desired where multiple sensors are used to provide information to the Detection, Recognition through Identification process, as well as, associated human or software-based threat assessment and reaction processes. Perimeter security typically involves several layers of detection and investigation. Many entities have invested in detection sensors only to find out that they lack integrated or queued investigative sensors that provide a better return on investment for their systems. When you add night vision sensors to the mix, the challenges increase. This paper will examine sensor technologies and integration/command control/analytics technologies that are attempting to tie things together. The latest technologies including queued sensors and advances in detection/analytics using PTZ sensors will be covered.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 May 2007
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6538, Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense VI, 65381H (4 May 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.722137
Show Author Affiliations
David Natelson, Vumii, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6538:
Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense VI
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

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