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Proceedings Paper

Hyperstereopsis in helmet-mounted NVDs: slope perception
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Paper Abstract

Modern helmet-mounted night vision devices, such as the Thales TopOwl helmet, project imagery from intensifiers mounted on the sides of the helmet onto the helmet faceplate. This produces a situation of hyperstereopsis in which binocular disparities are magnified. This has the potential to distort the perception of slope in depth (an important cue to landing), because the slope cue provided by binocular disparity conflicts with veridical cues to slope, such as texture gradients and motion parallax. In the experiments, eight observers viewed sparse and dense textured surfaces tilted in depth under three viewing conditions: normal stereo hyper-stereo (4 times magnification), and hypostereo (1/4 magnification). The surfaces were either stationary, or rotated slowly around a central vertical axis. Stimuli were projected at 6 metres to minimise conflict between accommodation and convergence, and stereo viewing was provided by a Z-screen and passive polarised glasses. Observers matched perceived visual slope using a small tilt table set by hand. We found that slope estimates were distorted by hyperstereopsis, but to a much lesser degree than predicted by disparity magnification. The distortion was almost completely eliminated when motion parallax was present.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 May 2007
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6557, Head- and Helmet-Mounted Displays XII: Design and Applications, 65570K (1 May 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.719116
Show Author Affiliations
Geoffrey W. Stuart, Defence Science and Technology Organisation (Australia)
Patrick Flanagan, Deakin Univ. (Australia)
Peter Gibbs, Defence Science and Technology Organisation (Australia)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6557:
Head- and Helmet-Mounted Displays XII: Design and Applications
Randall W. Brown; Colin E. Reese; Peter L. Marasco; Thomas H. Harding, Editor(s)

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