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Proceedings Paper

Evolution of live training by the implementation of an electronic bullet
Author(s): David Fisher; John Mann; Todd Sherrill; Matt Kraus; Jeff Lyons; Allen York
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Paper Abstract

In live force-on-force direct fire training, simulated munitions are used instead of live munitions. Simulated munitions are typically modeled using laser systems such as the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES). Replacing the laser with an electronic message (also known as an electronic bullet or e-bullet) sent over a network is becoming feasible due to advances in sensors, communications, and computing. The e-bullet engagement methodology uses weapon location, orientation, and adjudication algorithms. Technical challenges in implementation include having accurate weapon and target location and orientation, network bandwidth, and terrain database resolution. This paper discusses issues and challenges using an e-bullet and laser/e-bullet hybrids for delivery accuracy and damage assessment. We will also present an engagement methodology robust enough to evolve with advances in technology.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 May 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6564, Modeling and Simulation for Military Operations II, 65640D (10 May 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.717051
Show Author Affiliations
David Fisher, Applied Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
John Mann, Applied Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
Todd Sherrill, Applied Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
Matt Kraus, Applied Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
Jeff Lyons, Applied Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
Allen York, Applied Research Associates, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6564:
Modeling and Simulation for Military Operations II
Kevin Schum; Dawn A. Trevisani, Editor(s)

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