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Proceedings Paper

Initial experimentation with in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source
Author(s): Andrzej Krol; Russell Kincaid; Marina Servol; Jean-Claude Kieffer; Yakov Nesterets; Tim Gureyev; Andrew Stevenson; Steve Wilkins; Hongwei Ye; Edward Lipson; Remy Toth; Andrew Pogany; Ioana Coman
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Paper Abstract

We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the imaging performance of our newly constructed in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source. Projection images of nylon fibers with diameters in the 10-330 μm range were obtained using an ultrafast (100 Hz, 28 fs, 40 mJ) laser-based x-ray source with Mo and Ta targets and Be filter, and Gaussian spatial-intensity distribution (FWHMS = 5 μm). A cooled CCD camera (24 μm pitch) with a Gd2OS2 screen coupled via 1:1 optical taper was used (FWHMD = 50 μm). We have investigated nylon-fiber image quality vs. imaging setup geometry and x-ray spectra. The following parameters were evaluated: contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and sampling. In addition, we performed theoretical simulation of image formation for the same objects but within a wide range of geometrical parameters. The rigorous wave-optical formalism was used for modeling of the free-space propagation of x-rays from the object plane to the detector, and the "projection approximation" was used. We found reasonable agreement between predictions of our analytical model and the experiments. We conclude that: a) Optimum magnification maximizing contrast and SNR is almost independent of the source-to-detector (R) distance and depends strongly on the diameter of the fiber. b) The corresponding maximum values of the contrast and SNR are almost linear with respect to R; the optimum magnification decreases with fiber diameter. c) The minimum diameter of fiber defines the minimum source-to-object distance R1 if R is fixed and the object is moved.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 March 2007
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6510, Medical Imaging 2007: Physics of Medical Imaging, 65100L (16 March 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.713634
Show Author Affiliations
Andrzej Krol, SUNY Upstate Medical Univ. (United States)
Syracuse Univ. (United States)
Russell Kincaid, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
Marina Servol, INRS-EMT, Univ. du Québec (Canada)
Jean-Claude Kieffer, INRS-EMT, Univ. du Québec (Canada)
Yakov Nesterets, CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology (Australia)
Tim Gureyev, CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology (Australia)
Andrew Stevenson, CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology (Australia)
Steve Wilkins, CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology (Australia)
Hongwei Ye, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
Edward Lipson, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
Remy Toth, INRS-EMT, Univ. du Québec (Canada)
Andrew Pogany, CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology (Australia)
Ioana Coman, Ithaca College (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6510:
Medical Imaging 2007: Physics of Medical Imaging
Jiang Hsieh; Michael J. Flynn, Editor(s)

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