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Proceedings Paper

Use of a root zone soil moisture model and crop spectral characteristics to estimate sorghum yields in a dryland Alfisol toposequence
Author(s): Uttam Kumar Mandal; U. S. Victor; N. N. Srivastava; K. L. Sharma; V. Ramesh; M. Vanaja; G. R. Korwar; Y. S. Ramakrishna
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Paper Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between sorghum grain yield over range of soil depth with seasonal crop water stress index based on relative evapotranspiration deficits and spectral vegetation indices. A root zone soil moisture model has been used to evaluate the seasonal soil moisture fluctuation and actual evapotranspiration within a toposequence having varying soil depth of 30 to 75 cm as well as different available water capacity ranging from 6.9% to 12.6% (V/V%). The higher r2 values between modeled and observed values of soil water (r2> 0.69 significant at <0.001) and runoff (r2 = 0.95, significant at P<0.001) indicated good agreement between model output and observed values. The spectral vegetation indices like simple ratio, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), green NDVI, perpendicular vegetation index, soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) and modified SAVI (MSAVI) was recorded through out the growth period of sorghum. The vegetation indices except perpendicular vegetation index measured during booting to anthesis stages were positively correlated (P<0.05) with leaf area index and yield. The MSAVI measured during booting to milk-grain stage have the highest positive correlation with yield. Variation was noticed when additive and multiplicative forms of water-production functions calculated from water budget model were used to predict crop yield. But the yield estimation was improved when spectral vegetation indices measured during booting to milk-grain is incorporated along with water production functions. The water budget model along with spectral vegetation indices gave satisfactory estimates of sorghum grain yields and appears to be a useful tool to estimate yield as a function of soil depth and available soil water.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 December 2006
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6411, Agriculture and Hydrology Applications of Remote Sensing, 64110B (12 December 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.707846
Show Author Affiliations
Uttam Kumar Mandal, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)
U. S. Victor, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)
N. N. Srivastava, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)
K. L. Sharma, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)
V. Ramesh, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)
M. Vanaja, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)
G. R. Korwar, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)
Y. S. Ramakrishna, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (India)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6411:
Agriculture and Hydrology Applications of Remote Sensing
Robert J. Kuligowski; Jai S. Parihar; Genya Saito, Editor(s)

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