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Proceedings Paper

Combination of magnetic resonance imaging and diffuse optical spectroscopy to predict radiation response in the breast: an exploratory pilot study
Author(s): Catherine S. Klifa; Jona Hattangadi; M. Watkins; A. Li; T. Sakata; B. Tromberg; N. Hylton; C. Park M.D.
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Paper Abstract

Radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment after lumpectomy for breast cancer, involving a typical course of approximately 6-7 weeks of daily treatment. Many women find this cumbersome and costly, and therefore many are left with the option of mastectomy. Many groups are now investigating novel ways to deliver RT, by using different techniques and shortening the course of treatment. However, the efficacy and side effects of these strategies are not known. In this project, we wish to develop noninvasive imaging tools that would allow us to measure radiation dose effects in women with breast cancer. We hope this will lead to new ways to identify individuals who may not need radiation therapy, who may safely be treated with new accelerated techniques, or who should be treated with the standard radiation therapy approach. We propose to study the effect of radiation therapy using a combination of two imaging modalities: 1) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which will provide detailed information on breast structures and blood vessels and 2) near infra-red diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS), which measures local biologic properties of breast tissue. Our hypothesis is that by using a combination of modalities we will be able to better characterize radiation effects in breast tissue, by measuring differences between the radiated and non-irradiated breast. The development of novel non-invasive tools providing information about how individuals respond to radiation therapy can lead to important improvement of radiation treatment, and ultimately help guide individualized treatment programs in the future.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 February 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6431, Multimodal Biomedical Imaging II, 64310C (14 February 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.705675
Show Author Affiliations
Catherine S. Klifa, Univ. of California/San Francisco (United States)
Jona Hattangadi, Harvard Medical School (United States)
M. Watkins, Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States)
A. Li, Beckman Laser Institute (United States)
T. Sakata, Univ. of California/San Francisco (United States)
B. Tromberg, Beckman Laser Institute (United States)
N. Hylton, Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States)
C. Park M.D., Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6431:
Multimodal Biomedical Imaging II
Fred S. Azar, Editor(s)

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