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Proceedings Paper

More than a poplar plank: the shape and subtle colors of the masterpiece Mona Lisa by Leonardo
Author(s): François Blais; John Taylor; Luc Cournoyer; Michel Picard; Louis Borgeat; Guy Godin; J.-Angelo Beraldin; Marc Rioux; Christian Lahanier; Bruno Mottin
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Paper Abstract

During the autumn of 2004, a team of 3D imaging scientists from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) was invited to Paris to undertake the 3D scanning of Leonardo's most famous painting. The objective of this project was to scan the Mona Lisa, obverse and reverse, in order to provide high-resolution 3D image data of the complete painting to help in the study of the structure and technique used by Leonardo. Unlike any other painting scanned to date, the Mona Lisa presented a unique research and development challenge for 3D imaging. This paper describes this challenge and presents results of the modeling and analysis of the 3D and color data.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 January 2007
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6491, Videometrics IX, 649106 (29 January 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.705411
Show Author Affiliations
François Blais, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
John Taylor, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Luc Cournoyer, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Michel Picard, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Louis Borgeat, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Guy Godin, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
J.-Angelo Beraldin, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Marc Rioux, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Christian Lahanier, Ctr. de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (France)
Bruno Mottin, Ctr. de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6491:
Videometrics IX
J.-Angelo Beraldin; Fabio Remondino; Mark R. Shortis, Editor(s)

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