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Proceedings Paper

An investigation of the effect of image size on the color appearance of softcopy reproductions using a contrast matching technique
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Paper Abstract

Many art objects have a size much larger than their softcopy reproductions. In order to develop a multiscale model that accounts for the effect of image size on image appearance, a digital projector and LCD display were colorimetrically characterized and used in a contrast matching experiment. At three different sizes and three levels of contrast and luminance, a total of 63 images of noise patterns were rendered for both displays using three cosine log filters. Fourteen observers adjusted mean luminance level and contrast of images on the projector screen to match the images displayed on the LCD. The contrasts of the low frequency images on the screen were boosted while their mean luminance values were decreased relative to the smaller LCD images. Conversely, the contrast of projected high frequency images were reduced for the same images on LCD with a smaller size. The effect was more pronounced in the matching of projected image to the smaller images on the LCD display. Compared to the mean luminance level of the LCD images, a reduction of the mean luminance level of the adjusted images was observed for low frequency noise patterns. This decrease was more pronounced for smaller images with lower contrast and high mean luminance level.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 January 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6493, Color Imaging XII: Processing, Hardcopy, and Applications, 649309 (29 January 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.704282
Show Author Affiliations
Mahdi Nezamabadi, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)
Ethan D. Montag, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)
Roy S. Berns, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6493:
Color Imaging XII: Processing, Hardcopy, and Applications
Reiner Eschbach; Gabriel G. Marcu, Editor(s)

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