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Proceedings Paper

Patterned retinal coagulation with a scanning laser
Author(s): Daniel Palanker; ATul Jain; Yannis Paulus; Dan Andersen; Mark S. Blumenkranz
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Paper Abstract

Pan-retinal photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy typically involves application of more than 1000 laser spots; often resulting in physician fatigue and patient discomfort. We present a semi-automated patterned scanning laser photocoagulator that rapidly applies predetermined patterns of lesions; thus, greatly improving the comfort, efficiency and precision of the treatment. Patterns selected from a graphical user interface are displayed on the retina with an aiming beam, and treatment can be initiated and interrupted by depressing a foot pedal. To deliver a significant number of burns during the eye's fixation time, each pulse should be considerably shorter than conventional 100ms pulse duration. We measured coagulation thresholds and studied clinical and histological outcomes of the application of laser pulses in the range of 1-200ms in pigmented rabbits. Laser power required for producing ophthalmoscopically visible lesions with a laser spot of 132&mgr;m decreased from 360 to 37mW with pulse durations increasing from 1 to 100ms. In the range of 10-100ms clinically and histologically equivalent light burns could be produced. The safe therapeutic range of coagulation (ratio of the laser power required to produce a rupture to that for a light burn) decreased with decreasing pulse duration: from 3.8 at 100ms, to 3.0 at 20ms, to 2.5 at 10ms, and to 1.1 at 1ms. Histology demonstrated increased confinement of the thermal damage with shorter pulses, with coagulation zone limited to the photoreceptor layer at pulses shorter than 10ms. Durations of 10-20ms appear to be a good compromise between the speed and safety of retinal coagulation. Rapid application of multiple lesions greatly improves the speed, precision, and reduces pain in retinal photocoagulation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 March 2007
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 6426, Ophthalmic Technologies XVII, 64261E (5 March 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.701708
Show Author Affiliations
Daniel Palanker, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Stanford Univ. (United States)
ATul Jain, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Yannis Paulus, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Dan Andersen, OptiMedica Inc. (United States)
Mark S. Blumenkranz, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6426:
Ophthalmic Technologies XVII
Bruce E. Stuck; Fabrice Manns; Per G. Söderberg; Michael Belkin; Arthur Ho, Editor(s)

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