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Proceedings Paper

Measurement of blood perfusion using photoacoustic, ultrasound, and strain imaging
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Paper Abstract

In many clinical and research applications including cancer diagnosis, tumor response to therapy, reconstructive surgery, monitoring of transplanted tissues and organs, and quantitative evaluation of angiogenesis, sequential and quantitative assessment of microcirculation in tissue is required. In this paper we present an imaging technique capable of spatial and temporal measurements of blood perfusion through microcirculation. To demonstrate the developed imaging technique, studies were conducted using phantoms with modeled small blood vessels of various diameters positioned at different depths. A change in the magnitude of the photoacoustic signal was observed during vessel constriction and subsequent displacement of optically absorbing liquid present in the vessels. The results of the study suggest that photoacoustic, ultrasound and strain imaging could be used to sequentially monitor and qualitatively assess blood perfusion through microcirculation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 February 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6437, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2007: The Eighth Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics, 643707 (13 February 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.701230
Show Author Affiliations
Srivalleesha Mallidi, Univ. of Texas/Austin (United States)
Andrei B. Karpiouk, Univ. of Texas/Austin (United States)
Salavat R Aglyamov, Univ. of Texas/Austin (United States)
Shriram Sethuraman, Univ. of Texas/Austin (United States)
Stanislav Y. Emelianov, Univ. of Texas/Austin (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6437:
Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2007: The Eighth Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics
Alexander A. Oraevsky; Lihong V. Wang, Editor(s)

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