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Proceedings Paper

Stackable air-cooled heatsinks for diode lasers
Author(s): T. R. Crum; J. Harrison; R. Srinivasan; R. L. Miller
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Paper Abstract

Micro-channel heatsink assemblies made from bonding multi-layered etched metal sheets are commercially available and are often used for removing the high waste heat loads generated by the operation of diode-laser bars. Typically, a diode-laser bar is bonded onto a micro-channel (also known as mini-channel) heatsink then stacked in an array to create compact high power diode-laser sources for a multitude of applications. Under normal operation, the diode-laser waste heat is removed by passing coolant (typically de-ionized water) through the channels of the heatsink. Because of this, the heatsink internal structure, including path length and overall channel size, is dictated by the liquid coolant properties. Due to the material characteristics of these conductive heatsinks, and the necessary electrically serial stacking geometry, there are several restrictions imparted on the coolant liquid to maintain performance and lifetime. Such systems require carefully monitored and conductive limited de-ionized water, as well as require stable pH levels, and suitable particle filtration. These required coolant systems are either stand alone, or heat exchangers are typically costly and heavy restricting certain applications where minimal weight to power ratios are desired. In this paper, we will baseline the existing water cooled Spectra-Physics MonsoonTM heatsink technology utilizing compressed air, and demonstrate a novel modular stackable heatsink concept for use with gaseous fluids that, in some applications may replace the existing commercially available water-cooled heatsink technology. We will explain the various benefits of utilizing air while maintaining mechanical form factors and packing densities. We will also show thermal-fluid modeling results and predictions as well as operational performance curves for efficiency and power and compare these data to the existing commercially available technology.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 February 2007
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 6456, High-Power Diode Laser Technology and Applications V, 645619 (7 February 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.701091
Show Author Affiliations
T. R. Crum, Spectra Physics Semiconductor Lasers (United States)
J. Harrison, Spectra Physics Semiconductor Lasers (United States)
R. Srinivasan, Spectra Physics Semiconductor Lasers (United States)
R. L. Miller, Spectra Physics Semiconductor Lasers (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6456:
High-Power Diode Laser Technology and Applications V
Mark S. Zediker, Editor(s)

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