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Proceedings Paper

Improved murine glioma detection following modified diet and photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence
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Paper Abstract

The Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) - Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) system is unique in the world of photosensitizers in that the prodrug ALA is enzymatically transformed via the tissue of interest into fluorescently detectable levels of PpIX. This system can be used to monitor cellular metabolism of tumor tissue for applications such as therapy monitoring. Detecting PpIX fluorescence noninvasively has proven difficult due to the high levels of PpIX produced in the skin compared to other tissue both with and without ALA administration. In the current study, methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration have been examined. Use of a purified diet is found to decrease both skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration, while addition of a broad spectrum antibiotic to the water shows little effect. Following ALA administration, improved brain tumor detection is seen when skin PpIX fluorescence is photobleached via blue light prior to transmission spectroscopic measurements of tumor bearing and control animals. Both of these methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration are shown to have a large effect on the ability to detect tumor tissue PpIX fluorescence noninvasively in vivo.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 February 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6427, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVI, 64270D (27 February 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.700456
Show Author Affiliations
Summer L. Gibbs, Dartmouth College (United States)
Julia A. O'Hara, Dartmouth College (United States)
P. Jack Hoopes, Dartmouth College (United States)
Brian W. Pogue, Dartmouth College (United States)
Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6427:
Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVI
David Kessel, Editor(s)

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