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Proceedings Paper

The microstructure and LIDT of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 optical coatings
Author(s): G. Abromavicius; R. Buzelis; R. Drazdys; A. Melninkaitis; D. Miksys; V. Sirutkaitis; A. Skrebutenas; R. Juskenas; A. Selskis
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Paper Abstract

High power laser systems are one of the most rapidly growing areas in the development of laser technology. This also leads towards higher requirements for environmental stability of optical components and their resistance to laser radiation. There are some reports showing that porous dielectric coatings are more resistant to intense laser radiation, however they have smaller environmental stability than denser coatings, which are more sensitive to laser radiation. The influence of important technological parameters (deposition rate, substrate temperature, energy of ions) on optical and microstructural properties of high reflection dielectric coatings based on Nb2O5/SiO2, and Ta2O5/SiO2 in VIS spectral region is presented. Furthermore the LIDT measurements using repetitive nanosecond laser pulses of Nb2O5/SiO2 and Ta2O5/SiO2 high reflecting optical coatings based on ISO 11254-2 standard are presented.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 January 2007
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 6403, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2006, 640315 (15 January 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.696259
Show Author Affiliations
G. Abromavicius, Institute of Physics (Lithuania)
R. Buzelis, Institute of Physics (Lithuania)
R. Drazdys, Institute of Physics (Lithuania)
A. Melninkaitis, Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania)
D. Miksys, Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania)
V. Sirutkaitis, Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania)
A. Skrebutenas, Optida Co. (Lithuania)
R. Juskenas, Institute of Chemistry (Lithuania)
A. Selskis, Institute of Chemistry (Lithuania)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6403:
Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2006
Gregory J. Exarhos; Arthur H. Guenther; Keith L. Lewis; Detlev Ristau; M. J. Soileau; Christopher J. Stolz, Editor(s)

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