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Proceedings Paper

Perceptually driven 3D distance metrics with application to watermarking
Author(s): Guillaume Lavoué; Elisa Drelie Gelasca; Florent Dupont; Atilla Baskurt; Touradj Ebrahimi
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Paper Abstract

This paper presents an objective structural distortion measure which reflects the visual similarity between 3D meshes and thus can be used for quality assessment. The proposed tool is not linked to any specific application and thus can be used to evaluate any kinds of 3D mesh processing algorithms (simplification, compression, watermarking etc.). This measure follows the concept of structural similarity recently introduced for 2D image quality assessment by Wang et al.1 and is based on curvature analysis (mean, standard deviation, covariance) on local windows of the meshes. Evaluation and comparison with geometric metrics are done through a subjective experiment based on human evaluation of a set of distorted objects. A quantitative perceptual metric is also derived from the proposed structural distortion measure, for the specific case of watermarking quality assessment, and is compared with recent state of the art algorithms. Both visual and quantitative results demonstrate the robustness of our approach and its strong correlation with subjective ratings.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 August 2006
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 6312, Applications of Digital Image Processing XXIX, 63120L (24 August 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.686964
Show Author Affiliations
Guillaume Lavoué, LIRIS, CNRS, Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France)
INSA Lyon (France)
Elisa Drelie Gelasca, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)
Florent Dupont, LIRIS, CNRS, Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France)
INSA Lyon (France)
Atilla Baskurt, LIRIS, CNRS, Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France)
INSA Lyon (France)
Touradj Ebrahimi, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Switzerland)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6312:
Applications of Digital Image Processing XXIX
Andrew G. Tescher, Editor(s)

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