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Proceedings Paper

Distributed computing architecture for image-based wavefront sensing and 2D FFTs
Author(s): Jeffrey S. Smith; Bruce H. Dean; Shadan Haghani
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Paper Abstract

Image-based wavefront sensing provides significant advantages over interferometric-based wavefront sensors such as optical design simplicity and stability. However, the image-based approach is computationally intensive, and therefore, applications utilizing the image-based approach gain substantial benefits using specialized high-performance computing architectures. The development and testing of these computing architectures are essential to missions such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestrial Planet Finder-Coronagraph (TPF-C and CorSpec), and the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT). The algorithms implemented on these specialized computing architectures make use of numerous two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) which necessitate an all-to-all communication when applied on a distributed computational architecture. Several solutions for distributed computing are presented with an emphasis on a 64 Node cluster of digital signal processors (DSPs) and multiple DSP field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), offering a novel application of low-diameter graph theory. Timing results and performance analysis are presented. The solutions offered could be applied to other computationally complex all-to-all communication problems.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 June 2006
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6274, Advanced Software and Control for Astronomy, 627421 (27 June 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.672842
Show Author Affiliations
Jeffrey S. Smith, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Bruce H. Dean, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Shadan Haghani, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6274:
Advanced Software and Control for Astronomy
Hilton Lewis; Alan Bridger, Editor(s)

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