Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer: a low-complexity low-cost space mission for high-resolution astronomy and direct exoplanet detection
Author(s): R. K. Barry; W. C. Danchi; L. D. Deming; L. J. Richardson; M. J. Kuchner; S. Seager; B. J. Frey; A. J. Martino; K. A. Lee; M. Zuray; J. Rajagopal; T. T. Hyde; R. Millan-Gabete; J. D. Monnier; R. J. Allen; W. A. Traub
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) is a mission concept for a spacecraft-borne nulling interferometer for high-resolution astronomy and the direct detection of exoplanets and assay of their environments and atmospheres. FKSI is a high angular resolution system operating in the near to mid-infrared spectral region and is a scientific and technological pathfinder to the Darwin and Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) missions. The instrument is configured with an optical system consisting, depending on configuration, of two 0.5 - 1.0 m telescopes on a 12.5 - 20 m boom feeding a symmetric, dual Mach- Zehnder beam combiner. We report on progress on our nulling testbed including the design of an optical pathlength null-tracking control system and development of a testing regime for hollow-core fiber waveguides proposed for use in wavefront cleanup. We also report results of integrated simulation studies of the planet detection performance of FKSI and results from an in-depth control system and residual optical pathlength jitter analysis.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 July 2006
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 6265, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation I: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter, 62651L (6 July 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.672437
Show Author Affiliations
R. K. Barry, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
The Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
W. C. Danchi, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
L. D. Deming, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
L. J. Richardson, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
M. J. Kuchner, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
S. Seager, Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
B. J. Frey, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
A. J. Martino, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
K. A. Lee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
M. Zuray, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
J. Rajagopal, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Univ. of Maryland (United States)
T. T. Hyde, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
R. Millan-Gabete, California Institute of Technology (United States)
J. D. Monnier, Univ. of Michigan (United States)
R. J. Allen, The Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
W. A. Traub, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6265:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation I: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter
John C. Mather; Howard A. MacEwen; Mattheus W. M. de Graauw, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top