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Proceedings Paper

IRMOS: The near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for the TMT
Author(s): Stephen Eikenberry; David Andersen; Rafael Guzman; John Bally; Salvador Cuevas; Murray Fletcher; Rusty Gardhouse; Don Gavel; Anthony Gonzalez; Nicolas Gruel; Fred Hamann; Sam Hamner; Roger Julian; Jeff Julian; David Koo; Elizabeth Lada; Brian Leckie; J. Alberto Lopez; Roser Pello; Jorge Perez; William Rambold; Carlos Roman; Ata Sarajedini; Jonathan Tan; Kim Venn; Jean-Pierre Veran; John Ziegert
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Paper Abstract

We present an overview of the near-InfraRed Multi-Object Spectrograph (IRMOS) for the Thirty Meter Telescope, as developed under a Feasibility Study at the University of Florida and Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics. IRMOS incorporates a multi-object adaptive optics correction capability over a 5-arcminute field of regard on TMT. Up to 20 independently-selectable target fields-of-view with ~2-arcsec diameter can be accessed within this field simultaneously. IRMOS provides near-diffraction-limited integral field spectroscopy over the 0.8-2.5 μm bandpass at R~1,000-20,000 for each target field. We give a brief summary of the Design Reference science cases for IRMOS. We then present an overview of the IRMOS baseline instrument design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 June 2006
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6269, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy, 62695W (27 June 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.672266
Show Author Affiliations
Stephen Eikenberry, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
David Andersen, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Rafael Guzman, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
John Bally, Univ. of Colorado/Boulder (United States)
Salvador Cuevas, Univ. Autónoma Nacional de México (Mexico)
Murray Fletcher, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Rusty Gardhouse, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Don Gavel, Univ. of California/Santa Cruz (United States)
Anthony Gonzalez, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Nicolas Gruel, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Fred Hamann, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Sam Hamner, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Roger Julian, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Jeff Julian, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
David Koo, Univ. of California/Santa Cruz (United States)
Elizabeth Lada, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Brian Leckie, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
J. Alberto Lopez, Univ. Autónoma Nacional de México (Mexico)
Roser Pello, Lab. d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (France)
Jorge Perez, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
William Rambold, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Carlos Roman, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Ata Sarajedini, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Jonathan Tan, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)
Kim Venn, Univ. of Victoria (Canada)
Jean-Pierre Veran, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
John Ziegert, Bryant Space Science Ctr., Univ. of Florida (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6269:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy
Ian S. McLean; Masanori Iye, Editor(s)

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