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Proceedings Paper

Laboratory testing of the HEXIS hard x-ray imager balloon telescope
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Paper Abstract

The High Energy X-ray Imager Survey (HEXIS) Coded Mask balloon instrument will test the performance of the electronics and the detector for the proposed MIRAX satellite mission, and measure the background in a near space environment. HEXIS is a Coded Mask Imager based upon a 100 x 100mm Tungsten MURA mask and a set of four Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crossed strip detectors assembled as one detector module with 40 cm2 detector area and 0.5mm pitch strips creating an effective 126 x 126 grid of 0.5 x 0.5mm2 pixels. Each detector strip can be read out individually using Readout Electronics for Nuclear Application (RENA)-ASICs developed by NOVA R&D. The system has an operating energy range of <10 to 200 keV. The telescope has a passive shield as part of the instrument structure, which is surrounded by an active anti-coincidence shield of plastic scintillators with embedded wavelength shifting and light transmitting fibers. The first HEXIS balloon flight is planned for Spring 2007. We present the lab performance for one module using RENA ASICs and for the scintillator shield. The MIRAX Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) will contain two cameras with 9 detector modules each.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 June 2006
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6266, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation II: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, 626628 (13 June 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.671807
Show Author Affiliations
Slawomir Suchy, Ctr. for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
Michael R. Pelling, Ctr. for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
John A. Tomsick, Ctr. for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
James L. Matteson, Ctr. for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
Richard E. Rothschild, Ctr. for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6266:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation II: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray
Martin J. L. Turner; Günther Hasinger, Editor(s)

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