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Proceedings Paper

A large single-aperture telescope for submillimeter astronomy
Author(s): Wayne Holland; Rob Ivison; William Dent; Eli Atad; Ian Robson; Andy Longmore; Tim Hawarden; Jane Greaves; James Dunlop; Derek Ward-Thompson; Wolfgang Wild
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Paper Abstract

The large submillimeter telescope (LST) is a proposed wide-field, 30m-class telescope operating from a ground-based site in the relatively unexplored 0.2 - 1mm waveband. The telescope will be equipped with imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation to allow astronomers to probe the earliest evolutionary stages of galaxies, stars and planets. It is intended to operate the telescope in the 200μm atmospheric window, giving access to unique science; probing the peak emission from the cosmic far-IR/submm background and proto-stellar cores. The wide field-of-view and superb image fidelity will be perfect for large-scale surveys of the sky, such as entire giant molecular clouds and of fields of dusty galaxies at early epochs. It will therefore be an ideal complement to new generation interferometers (such as ALMA). In this paper we present an update on the science case and outline initial designs for both the telescope and instrumentation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 July 2006
PDF: 18 pages
Proc. SPIE 6267, Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes, 62672E (12 July 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.671379
Show Author Affiliations
Wayne Holland, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Rob Ivison, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
William Dent, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Eli Atad, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Ian Robson, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Andy Longmore, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory. (United Kingdom)
Tim Hawarden, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Jane Greaves, Univ. of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)
James Dunlop, Royal Observatory, Institute for Astronomy (United Kingdom)
Derek Ward-Thompson, Cardiff Univ. (United Kingdom)
Wolfgang Wild, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6267:
Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes
Larry M. Stepp, Editor(s)

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