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Proceedings Paper

eROSITA
Author(s): P. Predehl; G. Hasinger; H. Böhringer; U. Briel; H. Brunner; E. Churazov; M. Freyberg; P. Friedrich; E. Kendziorra; D. Lutz; N. Meidinger; M. Pavlinsky; E. Pfeffermann; A. Santangelo; J. Schmitt; P. Schuecker; A. Schwope; M. Steinmetz; L. Strüder; R. Sunyaev; J. Wilms
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Paper Abstract

eROSITA (extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) will be one out of three main instruments on the Russian new Spectrum-RG mission which will be launched in the timeframe 2010-2011 into an equatorial Low Earth Orbit. The other two instruments are the wide field X-ray monitor Lobster (Leicester University, UK) and ART (IKI, Russia), an X-ray concentrator based on a Kumakhov optics. eROSITA consists of seven Wolter-I telescope modules similar to the German mission ABRIXAS which failed in 1999 and ROSITA, a telescope which was planned to be installed on the International Space Station ISS. Unlike these, the eROSITA telescope modules will be extended by adding another 27 mirror shells to the already existing ABRIXAS design. This will increase the effective area by a factor of ~5 at low energies. The additional shells do not contribute to the area at higher energies ( > 5 keV) due to the relative large grazing angles. Here we stay with the old ABRIXAS/ROSITA effective area. However, the primary scientific goal has changed since ABRIXAS: we are now aiming primarily for the detection of 50-100 thousands Clusters of Galaxies up to redshifts z > 1 in order to study the large scale structure in the Universe and test cosmological models including the Dark Energy, which was not yet known at ABRIXAS times. For the detection of clusters, a large effective area is needed at low (< 2 kev) energies. The mission scenario comprises a wide survey of the complete extragalactic area and a deep survey in the neighborhood of the Galactic Poles. Both are accomplished by an all-sky survey with a tilt of the rotation axis in order to shift the deepest exposures away from the ecliptic poles towards the galactic poles.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 June 2006
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6266, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation II: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, 62660P (13 June 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.670249
Show Author Affiliations
P. Predehl, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
G. Hasinger, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
H. Böhringer, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
U. Briel, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
H. Brunner, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
E. Churazov, Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (Germany)
Space Resarch Institute (Russia)
M. Freyberg, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
P. Friedrich, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
E. Kendziorra, Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
D. Lutz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
N. Meidinger, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
M. Pavlinsky, Space Research Institute (Russia)
E. Pfeffermann, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
A. Santangelo, Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
J. Schmitt, Univ. Hamburg (Germany)
P. Schuecker, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
A. Schwope, Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam (Germany)
M. Steinmetz, Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam (Germany)
L. Strüder, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
R. Sunyaev, Space Research Institute (Russia)
Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (Germany)
J. Wilms, Astronomisches Institut, Univ. Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6266:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation II: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray
Martin J. L. Turner; Günther Hasinger, Editor(s)

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