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Proceedings Paper

Early attack reaction sensor (EARS), a man-wearable gunshot detection system
Author(s): Jay Chang; William Mendyk; Lisa Thier; Paul Yun; Andy LaRow; Scott Shaw; William Schoenborn
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Paper Abstract

The Early Attack Reaction Sensor (EARS) is a modified passive acoustic system that detects gunshots (muzzle blast and/or shockwave) to provide the user with relative azimuth and range of sniper fire via both audio alert and visual display. The EARS system consists of a microphone array in a small planar configuration and an equivalently sized Digital Signal Processing board, which is interfaced to a PDA via a PCMCIA slot. Hence, configuration easily provides portability. However, the system is being repackaged for man-wearable and vehicle mount applications. The EARS system in a PDA configuration has been tested in open fields at up to 500 meters range and has provided useable bearing and range information against the sniper rounds. This paper will discuss EARS system description, various test results, and EARS system capabilities and limitations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 May 2006
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6201, Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense V, 62011T (10 May 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.665978
Show Author Affiliations
Jay Chang, U.S. Army RDECOM (United States)
William Mendyk, U.S. Army RDECOM (United States)
Lisa Thier, U.S. Army RDECOM (United States)
Paul Yun, U.S. Army RDECOM (United States)
Andy LaRow, Planning Systems Inc. (United States)
Scott Shaw, Planning Systems Inc. (United States)
William Schoenborn, Planning Systems Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6201:
Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense V
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

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