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Proceedings Paper

Simulation training tools for nonlethal weapons using gaming environments
Author(s): Justin Eagan; Gabriel Tse; Tom Vanderslice; Jerry Woods
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Paper Abstract

Modern simulation techniques have a growing role for evaluating new technologies and for developing cost-effective training programs. A mission simulator facilitates the productive exchange of ideas by demonstration of concepts through compellingly realistic computer simulation. Revolutionary advances in 3D simulation technology have made it possible for desktop computers to process strikingly realistic and complex interactions with results depicted in real-time. Computer games now allow for multiple real human players and "artificially intelligent" (AI) simulated robots to play together. Advances in computer processing power have compensated for the inherent intensive calculations required for complex simulation scenarios. The main components of the leading game-engines have been released for user modifications, enabling game enthusiasts and amateur programmers to advance the state-of-the-art in AI and computer simulation technologies. It is now possible to simulate sophisticated and realistic conflict situations in order to evaluate the impact of non-lethal devices as well as conflict resolution procedures using such devices. Simulations can reduce training costs as end users: learn what a device does and doesn't do prior to use, understand responses to the device prior to deployment, determine if the device is appropriate for their situational responses, and train with new devices and techniques before purchasing hardware. This paper will present the status of SARA's mission simulation development activities, based on the Half-Life gameengine, for the purpose of evaluating the latest non-lethal weapon devices, and for developing training tools for such devices.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 May 2006
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 6219, Enabling Technologies and Design of Nonlethal Weapons, 62190L (26 May 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.664738
Show Author Affiliations
Justin Eagan, Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
Gabriel Tse, Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
Tom Vanderslice, Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc. (United States)
Jerry Woods, Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6219:
Enabling Technologies and Design of Nonlethal Weapons
Glenn T. Shwaery; John G. Blitch; Carlton Land, Editor(s)

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