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Proceedings Paper

Future trends and applications of ultrafast laser technology
Author(s): Jason M. Eichenholz; Mingwei Li; Ian Read; Stefan Marzenell; Philippe Féru; Rich Boggy; Jim Kafka
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Paper Abstract

In this talk we will present an overview of recent development of ultrafast lasers sources and their applications. This talk will highlight some recent state of the art ultrafast pulse results from Ti:Sapphire and Ytterbium based laser systems. There are significant advantages in being able to directly diode pump Ytterbium materials resulting in more compact bulk solid state and fiber based laser systems. Several newly emerging technologies such as Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification, and Supercontinuum Generation have generated great excitement in recent years. The evolution of more compact and user friendly ultrafast laser systems has enabled completely new fields that take advantage of the extremely high peak powers and very short time duration of ultrafast laser pulses. Recent results in the fields of multiphoton microscopy, micromachining, 3-D fabrication, and spectroscopy will be discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2006
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 6100, Solid State Lasers XV: Technology and Devices, 61000H (28 February 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.661032
Show Author Affiliations
Jason M. Eichenholz, Newport Corp. (United States)
Spectra-Physics (United States)
Mingwei Li, Spectra-Physics (United States)
Ian Read, Spectra-Physics (United States)
Stefan Marzenell, Spectra-Physics (United States)
Philippe Féru, Spectra-Physics (United States)
Rich Boggy, Spectra-Physics (United States)
Jim Kafka, Spectra-Physics (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6100:
Solid State Lasers XV: Technology and Devices
Hanna J. Hoffman; Ramesh K. Shori, Editor(s)

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