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Proceedings Paper

TEM studies of laterally overgrown GaN layers grown in polar and non-polar directions
Author(s): Z. Liliental-Weber; D. Zakharov; B. Wagner; R. F. Davis
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Paper Abstract

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study pendeo-epitaxial GaN layers grown on polar and non-polar 4H SiC substrates. The structural quality of the overgrown layers was evaluated using a number of TEM methods. Growth of pendeo-epitaxial layers on polar substrates leads to better structural quality of the overgrown areas, however edge-on dislocations are found at the meeting fronts of two wings. Some misorientation between the "seed" area and wing area was detected by Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction. Growth of pendeo-epitaxial layers on non-polar substrates is more difficult. Two wings on the opposite site of the seed area grow in two different polar directions with different growth rates and wings grown with Ga polarity are 17 times wider than wings grown with N-polarity, making coalescence of these layers difficult. Most dislocations in a wing grown with Ga polarity bend in a direction parallel to the substrate, but some of them also propagate to the sample surface. Stacking faults formed on the c-plane and prismatic plane occasionally were found in the wings. Some misorientation between the wings and seed was detected using Large Angle Convergent Beam Diffraction.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 March 2006
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6121, Gallium Nitride Materials and Devices, 612101 (3 March 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.659227
Show Author Affiliations
Z. Liliental-Weber, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States)
D. Zakharov, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States)
B. Wagner, North Carolina State Univ. (United States)
R. F. Davis, North Carolina State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6121:
Gallium Nitride Materials and Devices
Cole W. Litton; James G. Grote; Hadis Morkoc; Anupam Madhukar, Editor(s)

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