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Proceedings Paper

Noninvasive in vivo tissue and pulse modulated Raman spectroscopy of human capillary blood and plasma
Author(s): J. Chaiken; Katie Ellis; Patrick Eslick; Lauren Piacente; Ethan Voss
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Paper Abstract

We have refined of our previously published tissue modulation technique for obtaining Raman spectra of blood in fingertip capillary beds. Results from the newest LighTouch device benefit from more consistent management of applied force and temperature and more consistent tissue placement. Comparing these more precisely obtained spectra with other spectra obtained from the same capillary beds using the natural heart driven pulse as modulation reveals essential aspects of microcirculation such as plasma skimming, the Faraeus effect and the Faraeus-Lindqvist effect. We discuss these results in the context of performing noninvasive quantitative analysis of blood and blood components in vivo. We show the first Raman spectra of human blood plasma noninvasive, in vivo.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 February 2006
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6093, Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy III: Advances in Research and Industry, 609305 (27 February 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.659219
Show Author Affiliations
J. Chaiken, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
LighTouch Medical, Inc. (United States)
Katie Ellis, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
LighTouch Medical, Inc. (United States)
Patrick Eslick, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
LighTouch Medical, Inc. (United States)
Lauren Piacente, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
LighTouch Medical, Inc. (United States)
Ethan Voss, Syracuse Univ. (United States)
LighTouch Medical, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6093:
Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy III: Advances in Research and Industry
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen; Wolfgang H. Petrich, Editor(s)

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