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Proceedings Paper

Wound healing stimulation in mice by low-level light
Author(s): Tatiana N. Demidova; Ira M. Herman; Elena V. Salomatina; Anna N. Yaroslavsky; Michael R. Hamblin
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Paper Abstract

It has been known for many years that low levels of laser or non-coherent light (LLLT) accelerate some phases of wound healing. LLLT can stimulate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. It is thought to work via light absorption by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and consequent gene transcription. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT on wound healing, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed a model of a full thickness excisional wound in mice that allows quantitative and reproducible light dose healing response curves to be generated. We have found a biphasic dose response curve with a maximum positive effect at 2 J/cm2 of 635-nm light and successively lower beneficial effects from 3-25 J/cm2, the effect is diminished at doses below 2J/cm2 and gradually reaches control healing levels. At light doses above 25 J/cm2 healing is actually worse than controls. The two most effective wavelengths of light were found to be 635 and 820-nm. We found no difference between filtered 635±15-nm light from a lamp and 633-nm light from a HeNe laser. The strain and age of the mouse affected the magnitude of the effect. Light treated wounds start to contract after illumination while control wounds initially expand for the first 24 hours. Our hypothesis is that a single brief light exposure soon after wounding affects fibroblast cells in the margins of the wound. Cells may be induced to proliferate, migrate and assume a myofibroblast phenotype. Our future work will be focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying effects of light on wound healing processes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2006
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6140, Mechanisms for Low-Light Therapy, 61400C (28 February 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.646310
Show Author Affiliations
Tatiana N. Demidova, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Tufts Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Ira M. Herman, Tufts Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Elena V. Salomatina, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Anna N. Yaroslavsky, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
Michael R. Hamblin, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6140:
Mechanisms for Low-Light Therapy
Michael R. Hamblin; Ronald W. Waynant; Juanita Anders, Editor(s)

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