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Proceedings Paper

Quantitative photoacoustic image reconstruction for molecular imaging
Author(s): B. T. Cox; S. R. Arridge; P. C. Beard
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Paper Abstract

Biomedical photoacoustic imaging produces a map of the initial acoustic pressure distribution, or absorbed energy density, in tissue following a short laser pulse. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (QPI) takes the reconstruction process one stage further to produce a map of the tissue optical coefficients. This has two important advantages. Firstly, it removes the distorting effect of the internal light distribution on image contrast. Secondly, by obtaining images at multiple wavelengths, it enables standard spectroscopic techniques to be used to quantify the concentrations of specific chromophores, for instance, oxy and deoxy haemoglobin for the measurement of blood oxygenation - applying such techniques directly to "conventionally" reconstructed absorbed energy maps is problematic due to the spectroscopic 'spatial crosstalk' effects between different tissue chromophores. As well as naturally-occurring chromophores, dye-labelled molecular markers can be used to tag specific molecules, such as cell surface receptors, enzymes or pharmaceutical agents. In QPI, a diffusion-based finite element model of light transport in scattering media, with δ-Eddington scattering coefficients, is fitted to the absorbed energy distribution to estimate the optical coefficient maps. The approach described here uses a recursive algorithm and converges quickly on the absorption coefficient distribution, when the scattering is known. By adding an area of known absorption, an unknown constant scattering coefficient may also be recovered. With optical coefficient maps estimated in this way, QPI has the potential to be a powerful tool for quantifying the concentration of molecular markers in photoacoustic molecular imaging.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 March 2006
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6086, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2006: The Seventh Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics, 60861M (6 March 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.644806
Show Author Affiliations
B. T. Cox, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
S. R. Arridge, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
P. C. Beard, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6086:
Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2006: The Seventh Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics
Alexander A. Oraevsky; Lihong V. Wang, Editor(s)

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