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Proceedings Paper

Study of asthenopia caused by the viewing of stereoscopic images: measurement by MEG and other devices
Author(s): Hiroyuki Hagura; Masayuki Nakajima
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Paper Abstract

Three-Dimensional (hereafter, 3D) imaging is one of the very powerful tools to help the people to understand the spatial relationship of objects. Various glassless 3D imaging technologies for 3D TV, personal computers, PDA and cellular phones have been developed. These devices are often viewed for long periods. Most of the people who watch 3D images for a long time, experience asthenopia or eye fatigue. This concerns a preliminary study that attempted to find the basic cause of the problem by using MEG and the other devices. Plans call for further neurophysiological study on this subject. The purpose of my study is to design a standard or guidelines for shooting, image processing, and displaying 3D images to create the suitable images with higher quality and less or no asthenopia. Although it is difficult to completely avoid asthenopia when viewing 3D images, it would be useful if guidelines for the production of such images could be established that reduced its severity. The final goal of my research is to formulate such guidelines with an objective basis derived from measurement results from MEG and other devices. In addition to the study I was in charge of the work to install the world largest glasses-free 3D display to Japan Pavilion Nagakute in the 2005 World Exposition, Aichi, Japan during March, 25th to September 25th, 2005. And several types of large screen for 3D movies were available for testing, the result of the test to this report are added.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 February 2006
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6057, Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XI, 60570K (9 February 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.642943
Show Author Affiliations
Hiroyuki Hagura, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)
Masayuki Nakajima, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6057:
Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XI
Bernice E. Rogowitz; Thrasyvoulos N. Pappas; Scott J. Daly, Editor(s)

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