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Proceedings Paper

Comparison of phase modulation formats for 40 Gb/s ultralong-haul systems
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Paper Abstract

This paper studies advanced optical phase modulation formats in 40Gb/s Ultra-long-haul systems. As well known, the performance of 40Gb/s Ultra-long-haul systems depends upon the modulation formats. Since DPSK modulation format has higher spectral efficiency and more tolerance to fibre nonlinearity induced impairment, different duty cycle has important impact on result. In this letter, we comprehensively analyzed the transmitting performances of optical phase modulation formats with using the eye-opening penalty (EOP). NRZ-DPSK, full frequency modulated RZ-DPSK (FullRZ-DPSK), half frequency modulated RZ-DPSK (HalfRZ-DPSK) and CSRZ-DPSK modulation formats was numerical simulated within four kinds fiber system: G.652 Fiber, True Wave fiber (TW), True Wave-Reduced Slope fiber (TW-RS) and Large Effective Area Fiber (LEAF). Through modelling and simulation, we compute the EOP of these phase modulation formats, with different average optical input power. The numerical simulation result shows thatCSRZ-DPSK is best performance in all phase modulation, and G.652 outperforms other types of fibers in 40Gb/s Ultra-long-haul systems.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 December 2005
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6021, Optical Transmission, Switching, and Subsystems III, 60212A (9 December 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.635657
Show Author Affiliations
Bo Lei, Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecommunications (China)
Huijian Zhang, Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecommunications (China)
Wanyi Gu, Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecommunications (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6021:
Optical Transmission, Switching, and Subsystems III
Rodney S. Tucker; Dominique Chiaroni; Wanyi Gu; Ken-ichi Kitayama, Editor(s)

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