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Proceedings Paper

Intertwined twist and triangular arrangement for 3x3 fused couplers
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Paper Abstract

For 2 x 2 fused coupler, all power launched into first fiber is able to couple its whole power to second fiber after fusion. When fabricating monolithic fused coupler, degree of coupling (i.e. total power transfer from one fiber to another fiber) depends on all fibers put together in closed contact. For 3 x 3 coupler, the arrangements of fibers are normally equilateral triangle and linear array, each of which has its own advantages and applications. There are also other factors that determine the spectral characteristics of 3 x 3 fused coupler besides the arrangements of fibers. One of the factors is twist, specifically known as intertwined twist used in this work. In an equilateral triangle arrangement of fibers placed on a conventional Coupler Workstation, there is never total power transfer from the launched fiber to the non-launched fibers. The intertwined twist also modifies the equilateral triangle arrangement at fusion region and this causes more power to couple to one non-launched fiber then the other non-launched fiber. However, it is possible to get as close as 33 ± 3% splitting ratio among the three output ports by manipulating intertwined twist in the newly triangular arrangement of fibers.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 December 2005
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6019, Passive Components and Fiber-based Devices II, 60193N (3 December 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.634670
Show Author Affiliations
A. Z. Shaari, Univ. Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia)
S. Shaari, Univ. Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia)
M. A. Mahdi, Univ. Putra Malaysia (Malaysia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6019:
Passive Components and Fiber-based Devices II
Yan Sun; Jianping Chen; Sang Bae Lee; Ian H. White, Editor(s)

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