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Proceedings Paper

Silicon and germanium wafer-based optics for replacing low-to mid-IR aspheric lenses
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Paper Abstract

In the low-to-mid IR wavelength range there is a need for high performance, cost effective aspheric optics. Silicon has many advantages including high transmission and a high refractive index, but it can be very difficult to diamond turn. The resulting fabrication errors reduce efficiency and increase scattering and stray light. Wafer-based lithographic techniques can be used to make diffractive and refractive elements in both silicon and germanium. Advantages of diffractive structures such as: thinner elements, highly aspheric and even non-rotationally symmetric phase functions and chromatic compensation make this an attractive technology compared to diamond turning. In addition, wafer based fabrication makes these elements cost-effective in many applications. At Digital Optics Corporation, we have designed and fabricated wafer-based optics for use in the 1.3-14 micron range. In this paper, we will discuss the design, fabrication and evaluation of several product categories including a diffractive germanium beamshaper, a diffractive silicon aspheric lens, and a diffractive silicon spiral lens.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 October 2005
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 5987, Electro-Optical and Infrared Systems: Technology and Applications II, 59870H (12 October 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.631296
Show Author Affiliations
Robert D Te Kolste, Digital Optics Corp. (United States)
Robert E. Hutchins, Digital Optics Corp. (United States)
Jessica L. Wargats, Digital Optics Corp. (United States)
James T. A. Carriere, Digital Optics Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5987:
Electro-Optical and Infrared Systems: Technology and Applications II
Ronald G. Driggers; David A. Huckridge, Editor(s)

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