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Proceedings Paper

Shock characteristics obtained by nanosecond analyses for aerospace materials
Author(s): Yasuhisa Sato; Taku Ueno
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Paper Abstract

For numerical designs of safety cabin and seats to maintain a survivable environment for passengers and crew in a crash occurrence, very high-strain-rate characteristics of many kinds aerospace materials are indispensable. So, stress-time histories are obtained in two glassy polymers (polymethyl methacrylate: PMMA and polycarbonate: PC) and two kinds of light metals (commercially pure aluminum: A1100-H14[JIS] and super duralumin: A2024-T3[JIS]) at impact velocity 600 to 700 m/s using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) gauges in a plate impact testing by a powder gun. Nanosecond analyses are used to extract strain-time histories from experimental stress data. Then, stress-strain curves at very high-strain-rates (106 to 107 [1/s]) in shock wave region under conditions of uniaxial strain. A drop-hammer compression test is also used to determine stress-strain curves at medium strain rates (102 [1/s]) under conditions of uniaxial stress by using an extrapolation method. For low strain rates (ca. 10-4 [1/s]), stress-strain curves are determined under conditions of uniaxial stress by a universal testing machine combined with the extrapolation method. Power law relations between stress and strain-rate are observed with the glassy polymers under uniaxial strain conditions in a very wide strain-rate range.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 April 2005
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 5852, Third International Conference on Experimental Mechanics and Third Conference of the Asian Committee on Experimental Mechanics, (12 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.621949
Show Author Affiliations
Yasuhisa Sato, Tohoku Gakuin Univ. (Japan)
Taku Ueno, Tohoku Gakuin Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5852:
Third International Conference on Experimental Mechanics and Third Conference of the Asian Committee on Experimental Mechanics

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