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Proceedings Paper

Near infrared spectroscopy based brain-computer interface
Author(s): Sitaram Ranganatha; Yoko Hoshi; Cuntai Guan
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Paper Abstract

A brain-computer interface (BCI) provides users with an alternative output channel other than the normal output path of the brain. BCI is being given much attention recently as an alternate mode of communication and control for the disabled, such as patients suffering from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or "locked-in". BCI may also find applications in military, education and entertainment. Most of the existing BCI systems which rely on the brain's electrical activity use scalp EEG signals. The scalp EEG is an inherently noisy and non-linear signal. The signal is detrimentally affected by various artifacts such as the EOG, EMG, ECG and so forth. EEG is cumbersome to use in practice, because of the need for applying conductive gel, and the need for the subject to be immobile. There is an urgent need for a more accessible interface that uses a more direct measure of cognitive function to control an output device. The optical response of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) denoting brain activation can be used as an alternative to electrical signals, with the intention of developing a more practical and user-friendly BCI. In this paper, a new method of brain-computer interface (BCI) based on NIRS is proposed. Preliminary results of our experiments towards developing this system are reported.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 April 2005
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 5852, Third International Conference on Experimental Mechanics and Third Conference of the Asian Committee on Experimental Mechanics, (12 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.621536
Show Author Affiliations
Sitaram Ranganatha, Institute for Infocomm Research (Singapore)
Yoko Hoshi, Tokyo Institute of Psychiatry (Japan)
Cuntai Guan, Institute for Infocomm Research (Singapore)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5852:
Third International Conference on Experimental Mechanics and Third Conference of the Asian Committee on Experimental Mechanics
Chenggen Quan; Fook Siong Chau; Anand Asundi; Brian Stephen Wong; Chwee Teck Lim, Editor(s)

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