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Proceedings Paper

Graded coronagraphic masks for high-contrast near-infrared imaging
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Paper Abstract

We present here results from an experimental and theoretical study in the use of graded focal-plane occulting masks to improve high-contrast astronomical imaging at near-infrared wavelengths. The study includes investigations of both high-energy beam sensitive (HEBS) glass (a product of Canyon Materials, San Diego, CA) and binary notch-filter technologies to create precision graded occulting masks. In conjunction with this investigation, we conduct computer simulations showing expected high-contrast levels for various graded masks being considered for installation in the PHARO camera of the Palomar 200-inch (5m) Hale Telescope Adaptive Optics (AO) system. Our results demonstrate that the implementation of a graded exponential mask in the Palomar system should improve high-contrast sensitivities by about 2.4-mag in K-band (2.0-2.4 μm), for 0.75-1.5 arcsec separations. We also demonstrate that both HEBS and binary notch-filter technologies present adequate platforms for necessary occulting requirements. We conclude with a discussion of theinsights our study yields for planned space-based high-contrast observatories such as NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) and the proposed Eclipse mission.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 October 2005
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 5905, Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets II, 59051D (5 October 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.615935
Show Author Affiliations
Joseph C. Carson, California Insititute of Technology (United States)
Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Daniel W Wilson, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
John T. Trauger, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5905:
Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets II
Daniel R. Coulter, Editor(s)

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