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Proceedings Paper

Display station utilization in a PACS serving the medical intensive care unit of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
Author(s): Harold L. Kundel; Sridhar B. Seshadri; Bruce Carey; Sheel Kishore; Eric R. Feingold; Peter E. Shile; Ronald L. Arenson
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Paper Abstract

In 1987, a prospective study was done in an intensive care unit comparing a digitized-film picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) with a conventional-film management and display system. At that time a 512 X 512 X 8 bit display station was used only for about 30 of the cases. The display was upgraded to a 2560 X 2048 X 12 bit unit and a second prospective study again showed utilization for 30 of the cases. Then the image resolution was reduced to 1024 X 1024 in order to decrease the display writing time from 12 to 3.5 seconds. The user interface was also simplified. A recent prospective study showed that the display was utilized for all of the cases. For certain diagnostic categories such as ''check tube position'' it was used for primary reading while for more complicated categories such as ''rule out pneumonia'' it was used mainly for review.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 July 1992
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 1654, Medical Imaging VI: PACS Design and Evaluation, (1 July 1992); doi: 10.1117/12.60295
Show Author Affiliations
Harold L. Kundel, Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Sridhar B. Seshadri, Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Bruce Carey, Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Sheel Kishore, Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Eric R. Feingold, Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Peter E. Shile, Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Ronald L. Arenson, Univ. of California/San Francisco (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1654:
Medical Imaging VI: PACS Design and Evaluation
R. Gilbert Jost, Editor(s)

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