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Proceedings Paper

Finite element design study of a bladed, flat rotating disk to simulate cracking in a typical turbine disk
Author(s): Ali Abdul-Aziz; Jeffrey J. Trudell; George Y. Baaklini
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Paper Abstract

Developing health management and ultrasafe engine technologies are the primary goals of NASA's Aviation Safety Program. Besides improving safety, health monitoring can also reduce maintenance costs. A unique disk spin simulation system was assembled by the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group at NASA Glenn Research Center to verify and study a crack detection technique based upon observing center of mass changes of the rotor system using various sensing technologies. This paper describes the finite element analysis results of low cost, a 25.4 cm (10 in.) diameter, flat turbine disk used to evaluate the detection techniques by simulating typical cracks observed in turbine engine disks. Changes in radial tip displacement and center of mass are presented as a function of speed, crack size and location.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 May 2005
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 5767, Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring of Aerospace Materials, Composites, and Civil Infrastructure IV, (19 May 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.601896
Show Author Affiliations
Ali Abdul-Aziz, NASA Glenn Research Ctr. (United States)
Cleveland State Univ. (United States)
Jeffrey J. Trudell, NASA Glenn Research Ctr. (United States)
George Y. Baaklini, NASA Glenn Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5767:
Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring of Aerospace Materials, Composites, and Civil Infrastructure IV
Peter J. Shull; Andrew L. Gyekenyesi; Aftab A. Mufti, Editor(s)

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