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Proceedings Paper

Segmented binary control of multi-axis SMA array actuators
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Paper Abstract

A new approach to designing and controlling multiple artificial muscle actuators using Segmented Binary Control (SBC) is presented and is implemented using shape memory alloys (SMA). SMA actuators are segmented into many independently controlled, spatially discrete volumes, each contributing a small displacement to create a large motion. The segmented architecture of SMA wires is extended to a multi-axis actuator array by arranging them in a two-dimensional array. For multi axis case, the number of segments can be reduced by activating adjacent SMA wires with coupled segments. Coupled segments activate multiple actuators that the segment covers. Although independence of the adjacent SMA wires is reduced to a certain degree, coordinated movements are generated. The shape and position of the coupled segments can be designed using the "similarity" of output trajectories of each actuator. SBC is extended into Hysteresis Loop Control, which reduces the delay in the system by using four different temperatures instead of just two temperatures that the SBC uses. Thermoelectric devices are used to locally heat and cool the SMA wires. Single-axis experimental setup is built to verify and compare the SBC and HLC, and multi-axis array actuator system that uses SBC is built with ten SMA actuators in parallel.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 May 2005
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 5757, Smart Structures and Materials 2005: Modeling, Signal Processing, and Control, (19 May 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.600307
Show Author Affiliations
Kyu-Jin Cho, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Brian Selden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
H. Harry Asada, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5757:
Smart Structures and Materials 2005: Modeling, Signal Processing, and Control
Ralph C. Smith, Editor(s)

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