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Proceedings Paper

Nonlinear analysis of sensor diaphragm under initial tension
Author(s): Miao Yu; B. Balachandran; X.-H. Long
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Paper Abstract

In this article, recent investigations into the dynamic behavior of a sensor diaphragm under initial tension are presented. A comprehensive mechanics model based on a plate with in-plane tension is presented and analyzed to examine the transition from plate behavior to membrane behavior. It is shown that, for certain tension parameter values, it is appropriate to model the diaphragm as a plate-membrane structure rather than as a membrane. In the nonlinear analysis, the effect of cubic nonlinearity is studied when the excitation frequency is either close to one-third of the first natural frequency or the first natural frequency. The nonlinear effects limit the sensor bandwidth and dynamic range. The study shows that both of the nonlinear effects can be attenuated by decreasing the diaphragm thickness and applying an appropriate tension to realize the desired first natural frequency while reducing the strength of the nonlinearity. The analyses and related results should be valuable for carrying out the design of circular diaphragms for various sensor applications, in particular, for designing sensors on small scales.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 May 2005
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 5757, Smart Structures and Materials 2005: Modeling, Signal Processing, and Control, (19 May 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.599945
Show Author Affiliations
Miao Yu, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
B. Balachandran, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
X.-H. Long, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5757:
Smart Structures and Materials 2005: Modeling, Signal Processing, and Control
Ralph C. Smith, Editor(s)

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