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Proceedings Paper

Experimental study of 351-nm and 527-nm laser-initiated surface damage on fused silica surfaces due to typical contaminants
Author(s): John Honig; Mary A. Norton; William G. Hollingsworth; Eugene E. Donohue; Michael A. Johnson
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Paper Abstract

Optics damage under high-intensity illumination may be the direct result of laser light interaction with a contaminant on the surface. Contaminants of interest are small particles of the materials of construction of large laser systems and include aluminum, various absorbing glasses, and fused silica. In addition, once a damage site occurs and begins to grow, the ejecta from the growing damage site create contamination on nearby optic surfaces and may initiate damage on these surfaces via a process we call "fratricide." We report on a number of experiments that we have performed on fused silica optics that were deliberately contaminated with materials of interest. The experiments were done using 527-nm light as well as 351-nm light. We have found that many of the contaminant particles are removed by the interaction with the laser and the likelihood of removal and/or damage is a function of both fluence and contaminant size. We have developed an empirical model for damage initiation in the presence of contaminants.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2005
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 5647, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2004, (21 February 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.597314
Show Author Affiliations
John Honig, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Mary A. Norton, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
William G. Hollingsworth, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Eugene E. Donohue, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Michael A. Johnson, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5647:
Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2004
Gregory J. Exarhos; Arthur H. Guenther; Norbert Kaiser; Keith L. Lewis; M. J. Soileau; Christopher J. Stolz, Editor(s)

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