Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Gender differences in the processing of standard emotional visual stimuli: integrating ERP and fMRI results
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

The comprehensive understanding of human emotion processing needs consideration both in the spatial distribution and the temporal sequencing of neural activity. The aim of our work is to identify brain regions involved in emotional recognition as well as to follow the time sequence in the millisecond-range resolution. The effect of activation upon visual stimuli in different gender by International Affective Picture System (IAPS) has been examined. Hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses were measured in the same subjects. Both fMRI and ERP study were employed in an event-related study. fMRI have been obtained with 3.0 T Siemens Magnetom whole-body MRI scanner. 128-channel ERP data were recorded using an EGI system. ERP is sensitive to millisecond changes in mental activity, but the source localization and timing is limited by the ill-posed 'inversed' problem. We try to investigate the ERP source reconstruction problem in this study using fMRI constraint. We chose ICA as a pre-processing step of ERP source reconstruction to exclude the artifacts and provide a prior estimate of the number of dipoles. The results indicate that male and female show differences in neural mechanism during emotion visual stimuli.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 April 2005
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 5746, Medical Imaging 2005: Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images, (14 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.595977
Show Author Affiliations
Lei Yang, Institute of Automation/CAS (China)
Jie Tian, Institute of Automation/CAS (China)
Graduate School of CAS (China)
Xiaoxiang Wang, Institute of Automation/CAS (China)
Jin Hu, Institute of Automation/CAS (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5746:
Medical Imaging 2005: Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images
Amir A. Amini; Armando Manduca, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top