Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Time domain fluorescent diffuse optical tomography
Author(s): Sirithy Lam; Frederic Lesage; Xavier Intes
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Light propagation in tissue is known to be favored in the near infrared spectral range. Capitalizing on this fact, new classes of molecular contrast agents are engineered to fluoresce in the NIR. The potential of these new agents is vast as it allows tracking non-invasively and quantitatively specific molecular events in-vivo. However, to monitor the bio-distribution of such compounds in thick tissue proper physical models of light propagation are necessary. To recover 3D concentrations of the compound distribution, it is necessary to perform a model based inverse problem: Diffuse Optical tomography. In this work, we focus on fluorescent diffuse optical tomography expressed within the normalized Born approach. More precisely, we investigate the performances of Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) in the case of time resolved measurements. The different moments of the time point spread function (TPSF) were analytically derived to construct the forward model. The derivation was performed from the zero order moment to the second moment. This new forward model approach was validated with simulations based on relevant parameters. Enhanced performance of FMT was achieved using these new analytical solutions when compared to the current formulations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 December 2004
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 5578, Photonics North 2004: Photonic Applications in Astronomy, Biomedicine, Imaging, Materials Processing, and Education, (9 December 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.593754
Show Author Affiliations
Sirithy Lam, ART Advanced Research Technologies Inc. (Canada)
Frederic Lesage, ART Advanced Research Technologies Inc. (Canada)
Xavier Intes, ART Advanced Research Technologies Inc. (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5578:
Photonics North 2004: Photonic Applications in Astronomy, Biomedicine, Imaging, Materials Processing, and Education

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top